The George Institute For Global Health
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Media releases

Media release: 
11/02/2015

US/EU relaxation of diabetes blood pressure lowering guidelines ignore evidence, threaten UK treatment.

Media release: 
02/12/2014

Structured exercise including resistance training and walking helps people recover from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder as well as other mental health conditions, a new study has revealed.

Media release: 
10/11/2014

— New Initiative Designed to Support the Development of Community Healthcare and Contribute to Mobile Health Innovation in China —

Media release: 
16/09/2014

Mobile phones and smart devices will have a large role to play in improving access to healthcare and involving patients more in their own treatment, a leading Oxford University academic has said in a lecture in New Delhi.

Media release: 
01/09/2014

Australian researchers have discovered that the reductions in heart events and death, from using blood pressure-lowering drugs in patients with type 2 diabetes, persist for many years after treatment has stopped.

Media release: 
26/08/2014

“By pooling data on one million mothers and babies, we hope to see connections that have not been evident before and find a way to prevent childhood cancer.”

Media release: 
25/08/2014

Preeminent global medical researcher Terry Dwyer revolutionised the world’s approach to SIDS. Now, he is bringing the world’s largest childhood cancer research project to an Australian-based medical research institute in Britain.

Media release: 
15/08/2014

In a landmark study published in The Lancet today, a global team of researchers has shown that if doctors simply changed the way they determine who to administer blood pressure-lowering treatment to, many less people would die or suffer serious heart conditions.

Media release: 
24/07/2014

In the world’s first large placebo-controlled trial, we have demonstrated that taking paracetamol does not speed recovery or reduce pain compared to placebo.

Media release: 
11/07/2014

Australian researchers reveal that sudden, acute episodes of low back pain are not linked to weather conditions such as temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction and precipitation. 

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