The George Institute For Global Health
Global
United Kingdom
India
China
Australia

Media releases

Media release: 
31/07/2017

A landmark project to improve the lives of people living in cities in developing countries has been awarded £7 million.

Media release: 
18/07/2017

Researchers from The George Institute for Global Health have been awarded funds from UK’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) to address the health challenge of stroke care in India and tackle salt consumption in China.

Media release: 
02/05/2017

South Africa is on track to meet mandatory salt targets, according to analysis of more than 11,000 packaged foods. But, the study by The George Institute, UK shows found many commonly eaten products including bread, sausages and crisps still contained high levels of salt just months before the new limits were introduced in 2016.

Media release: 
19/01/2017

Women from low socioeconomic backgrounds are 25 per cent more likely to suffer a heart attack than disadvantaged men, a major new study has found.

Media release: 
11/01/2017

The weather plays no part in the symptoms associated with either back pain or osteoarthritis, a new study by The George Institute for Global Health has revealed.

Media release: 
04/10/2016

​Public urged to vote for the project to win the People’s Choice Award.

Media release: 
31/08/2016

The largest sleep study ever undertaken has found that the leading therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP), does not reduce recurrent strokes and heart attacks in people with cardiovascular disease but does significantly improve their quality of life and mood.

Media release: 
20/07/2016

Eating more unsaturated fats, especially polyunsaturated fats, in place of either dietary carbohydrate or saturated fats lowers blood sugar levels and improves insulin resistance and secretion, according to a new study.

Media release: 
23/05/2016

People suffering from heart failure should be given the flu vaccine, according to new research from The George Institute for Global Health.

Media release: 
19/05/2016

High blood pressure could significantly raise the risk of developing the second most common form of dementia, according to a new study from The George Institute for Global Health.

Pages